Reflective Supervision/Consultation

It is in the best interest of practitioners who promote IMH, as well as the families they serve, if the reflective supervisor/consultant meets the standards below.

As in relationship-focused practice with families, RS/C is most effective when it occurs in the context of a relationship that has an opportunity to develop by meeting regularly with the same supervisor/consultant over a period of time.  Therefore, MI-AIMH expects that Endorsement® candidates will have received the majority of the required hours from just one source with the balance coming from no more than one other source.

Qualified providers of reflective supervision/consultation

APPLICANT AND/OR ENDORSED PROFESSIONALFor applicants
earning Endorsement®
For professionals
renewing Endorsement® (annually)
RENEWAL REQUIREMENT ENDS
INFANT FAMILY SPECIALIST (II)
Bachelor’s prepared
Minimum 24 clock hours

Provider should be:
Master’s prepared Infant Family Specialist (II)

OR

Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
Minimum 12 clock hours

Provider should be:
Master’s prepared Infant Family Specialist (II)

OR

Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor - Clinical (IV)
On-going
INFANT FAMILY SPECIALIST (II)
Master’s prepared
Minimum 24 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
Minimum 12 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
On-going
INFANT MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST (III)
Direct service provider
Minimum 50 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
Minimum 12 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
On-going
INFANT MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST (III)
Provider of RSC to others
Minimum 50 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Specialist (III)

OR

Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
Minimum 12 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
On-going
INFANT MENTAL HEALTH MENTOR - CLINICAL (IV) Minimum 50 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Mentor - Clinical (IV)
Minimum 12 clock hours

Provider should be:
Infant Mental Health Mentor -Clinical (IV)
After having earned & maintained IMH Mentor -Clinical for a minimum of 3 years

Please note:  Peer supervision (defined as colleagues meeting together without an identified supervisor/consultant to guide the reflective process), while valuable for many experienced practitioners, does not meet the RS/C criteria for Endorsement® even if one of the peers has earned Endorsement® at Level III or Level IV-Clinical.  The provider of RS/C is charged with holding the emotional content of the cases presented.  The ability to do so is compromised when the provider is a peer of the presenter.  Unnecessary complications can arise when the provider of RS/C has concerns about a peer’s ability to serve a particular family due to the peer’s emotional response AND the provider and peer share office space, for example.


Looking for additional resources about RS/C?

  • MI-AIMH’s Best Practice for Reflective Supervision/Consultation Guidelines
  • MI-AIMH’s Infant Mental Health Consultant Competencies
  • Bernstein, V.  (2002-03).  Standing Firm Against the Forces of Risk:  Supporting Home Visiting and Early Intervention Workers through Reflective Supervision.  Newsletter of the Infant Mental Health Promotion Project (IMP).  Volume 35, Winter 2002-03.
  • Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Services, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. (2000). Early childhood mental health consultation (monograph). Washington, DC: National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health, Georgetown University Child Development Center.
  • Fenichel, E. (Ed.).  (1992).  Learning Through Supervision and Mentorship to Support the Development of Infants, Toddlers and their Families: A Source Book.  Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three.
  • Bertacci, J. & Coplon, J. (1992). The professional use of self in prevention pp. 84-90.
  • Schafer, W. (1992).  The professionalization of early motherhood, pp. 67-75.
  • Shahmoon Shanock, R. (1992). The supervisory relationship: Integrator, resource and guide, 37-41.
  • Foulds, B. &  Curtiss, K. (2002). No Longer Risking Myself: Assisting the Supervisor Through Supportive Consultation.  In  Shirilla, J. & Weatherston, D. (Eds.), Case Studies in Infant Mental Health: Risk, Resiliency, and Relationships.    Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three, pp. 177-186.
  • Heffron, M.C. (2005).  Reflective Supervision in Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Work.  In  K. Finello (Ed.),  The Handbook of Training and Practice in Infant and Preschool Mental Health.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp. 114-136.
  • Journal for ZERO TO THREE (November, 2007) Reflective Supervision: What is it? Vol. 28, No. 2.
  • Eggbeer, L., Mann, T. & Seibel, N. (2007). Reflective supervision: Past, present, and future.
  • Heffron, M., Grunstein, S. & Tiemon, S. (2007) Exploring diversity in supervision and practice.
  • Schafer, W. (2007). Models and domains of supervision and their relationship to professional development.
  • Weatherston, D. (2007) A home based infant mental health intervention: The centrality of relationship in reflective supervision.
  • Weigand, R. (2007) Reflective supervision in child care: The discoveries of an accidental tourist.
  • Wightman, B., Weigand, B., Whitaker, K., Traylor, D., Yeider, S. Hyden, V. (2007) Reflective practice and supervision in child abuse prevention.
  • Parlakian, R. (2002). Look, Listen, and Learn: Reflective Supervision and Relationship-Based Work.  Washing-ton, D.C.: Zero to Three.
  • Pawl, J. & St. John, M. (1998).  How you are is as important as what you do.  In Making a Positive Difference for Infants, Toddlers and their Families.  Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three.
  • Scott Heller, S., & Gilkerson, L. (Eds.). (2009).  A practical guide to reflective supervision.  Washington, DC.:  ZERO TO THREE.
  • Shahmoon Shanok, R., Gilkerson, L., Eggbeer, L. & Fenichel, E. (1995).  Reflective Supervision: A Relation-ship for Learning. Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three, p. 37-41.